Learn to Avoid Foods That Trigger Lupus Flares – With an Easy, at Home Food Allergy Testing Strategy

Jul 13 2020 Published by under Uncategorized

A food allergy is an immune response to a particular food or beverage, similar to the immune response against the body itself in a lupus patient. Don’t confuse food allergies with food intolerances; they are different. When you experience food intolerance, it is not caused by the immune system, and is simply an adverse response by your body to a particular food (like lactose intolerance).

You’ve got to take care of yourself; having lupus or any auto-immune disease makes you especially susceptible to food allergies and these allergic reactions can instigate flares.

There are many ways to determine food allergies and the symptoms they produce. According to the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network, you should watch for the following 7 symptoms up to two hours of eating.

Food allergy symptoms to watch out for:

o Tingling sensation in the mouth

o Swelling of the tongue and the throat

o Difficulty breathing

o Hives

o Vomiting, abdominal cramps, or diarrhea

o Sudden drop in blood pressure

o Loss of consciousness

If you suspect you have a food allergy, it is important to work with a health professional, because while simply cutting that food out of your diet may alleviate your symptoms, it won’t address the potential allergy itself.

Allergy testing is easier than it sounds. You might be afraid of needles, but in most cases you don’t even have to see them!

Common allergy testing methods:

Pin Prick allergy testing

In the pin prick skin test the doctor places a small drop of the substance (in this case food) that you may be allergic to on your skin and then pricks you with a tiny needle. He or she will then wait for a few minutes to see if you develop a reaction, which is usually localized in the form of redness and swelling.

RAST Allergy Test

The RAST test is another allergy test that requires a blood sample sent to a lab, where specialized tests are done to determine your allergies.

The At-Home Allergy Pulse Test

Another easy way to get an indication of a food allergy is by using the at-home allergy pulse test. This is done by checking your pulse rate before and after eating. When you maintain a close watch over your pulse rate while you challenge different foods, you can often determine possible food reactions. However, it is important that you do not use or rely on this test if you have a history of strong allergic reactions, especially anaphylaxis (a life-threatening allergic reason which results in swelling of the throat).

To perform the pulse test on yourself, simply take your pulse before eating a meal to establish your base (or control) pulse rate.

It’s best to eat a single food, and then re-check your pulse rate at 15, 30 and 60 minutes afterwards. If you see an increase in elevation of more than 10 beats faster than your base pulse, it means you are likely allergic to that food.

An obvious problem is that you may want to eat more than one food at a time. Go ahead and eat that meal, and again do your pulse test before, and after your meal as above. In this way you’ll be able to determine if the foods don’t have any effect, or if there are foods creating a reaction with an elevated pulse rate.

To start testing your food reactions, a simple natural diet is the way to go. Stick with meals that don’t require a lot of work and include just a few simple ingredients.

If you do find an increased pulse, it’s a good idea to test each food separately in order to narrow down which food ingredient is the culprit from that meal.

Be sure to keep a diary with you at all times, so you can keep a proper record and learn to identify which foods, if any, are triggering a flare. Be cautioned though, food triggers and their reactions can change, therefore be tricky to catch. However, this test is a great start to taking control of unnecessary flares that result from food allergies.

It is best to work with an experienced wellness specialist to help you maintain your health program and get further support to answer your health questions when necessary.

90% of all food allergies are caused by only eight foods!

Yes, it’s true. Only 8 common foods are the culprit for most food allergies. These are milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts (such as walnuts, cashews, and pistachios), fish, shellfish, soy, and wheat. You should also avoid spicy foods, processed foods (such as American cheese), alcohol, chocolate, and caffeine if you have Lupus. I know this sounds like no fun at all, but all of these have the potential to mess with your immune system and have unexpected effects on your body. That’s the last thing you need to worry about with lupus!

One way to recall these foods is by remembering the term ‘DONGS’, which stands for:

Dairy: Cow’s milk and related products, goats’ milk and related products, eggs

Ocean: Fish, shellfish

Nuts: Peanuts, tree nuts

Grains: Soy, wheat, wheat, rye, oats, barley, anything referred to as “gluten”

Spices: Paprika, garlic, cinnamon, cloves, cola, liquorice, mustard, oregano, peppers, poppy seeds, and sage

Now that I’ve told you all the no-no’s… we can go over some of the foods you can eat and enjoy without fear of stimulating your immune system. Foods like brown rice, sweet potatoes, and veggies can make up delicious dishes full of energy and carbs to keep you going through the day. For a refreshing drink, why not reach for some fresh fruits or veggies and make a nice juiced smoothie or drink that will support your immune system and energy as well (just avoid asparagus, eggplant, onion, zucchini, raw olives, and peppers).

It’s important to keep your strength up so you can fight the lupus all day, not just after eating, so try and have several smaller meals throughout the day versus 2 or 3 heavy meals that will rob you of precious energy you don’t have to waste.

To learn more about the essentials of a healthy Lupus diet, plus holistic approaches to reducing Lupus symptoms visit Healing-Lupus.com for a free mini course.

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Pet Food Market – Trends, Industry Competitiveness and Future Outlook

Jul 13 2020 Published by under Uncategorized

PET FOOD MARKET

The pet food market was valued at USD 74.9 billion in 2016. North America accounted for the largest share of over 35% of the global market in 2016. The second largest market is Europe, followed by Asia-Pacific with around 20% of the market share, thus, accelerating the trend of pet owners across the globe. In North America, the United States holds the major market share of pets and pet owners, which is expected to register a high CAGR, during 2017-2022 (the forecast period).

TASTES FOR NEW EXPERIENCES AND PORTIONS AS INDULGENCE ALIBI

Flavors and textures are becoming bolder, more complex, authentic, and specific. The correlation of pet food and the modern formats blending freeze-dried bits, with kibble or treats, for texture variations, is making pet owners choose from a range of variety of shapes, textures, and flavors. Moreover, clean labeling continues to grow. Health conscious consumers look for permissible indulgences, like the smaller portion sizes of treats or candies with healthier ingredients like chia seeds or yogurt. Pet treats are developing, in terms of ingredients with functional or other nutritional benefits, which is allowing pet owners to indulge their pets free from guilt. New dog food products comprised of 80% of the global launches in 2015. The launches from September 2015 to September 2016, are keeping the health-related trend intact in new products by category. The share for cat food was around 68% globally. This trend of health and wellness has made good sales for the manufacturers. A few instances in this context are Hill’s Ideal Balance, a new range of dog and cat food that combines natural ingredients with Hill’s perfectly balanced nutrition, is now available in South Africa. CORE® RawRev, a new high-protein grain-free product, is launched by Wellness CORE®, a family of grain-free, natural animal nutrition company.

IMPROVEMENT IN DISTRIBUTION NETWORK LEADS TO GROWTH IN PET FOOD SALES

The high internet connectivity available in the major countries is boosting the use on e-commerce sites as an effective distribution channel. The notions of convenience, affluence or exclusivity, safety, and market awareness play a very crucial role in the developing nations. The unreliability of local goods, as indicated by the recent scandals, is also making people rely on foreign goods. These are made easily available through the e-commerce, further making the sales high. Owing to the industry’s two pet superstores, PetSmart and Petco, the e-commerce channel is exploding with the pet product sales. The late embrace of the market connectivity in the minor markets of small economies, such as Vietnam, Thailand etc., is a cause of infrastructure lag and almost negligible product awareness. These stores offer the nascent market advantages of low regulations and competition. The companies, as the e-commerce is strengthening, are negotiating the ever-changing internet landscape with the factors such as dealing with giants like Amazon that is deciding to sell through similar e-commerce websites and mergers & acquisitions. For instance, in April 2017, PetSmart announced that it will acquire Chewy.com, which heightened the consternation in the independent pet retailers. In response, Tuffy’s Pet Food, a manufacturer to independent and family-owned businesses, announced pulling out its products from Chewy, as it would be owned by the largest US pet store chain. Though Tuffy’s reports a very positive response, not every company detaches itself easily from any large e-commerce sites.

“FREE FROM ALL” AND “FLEXITARIAN EFFECT” BOTH HAVING THEIR WAY TOGETHER

Though the consumers today are part-time vegetarians, they seem to do the opposite when it comes to pet food. The pet owners look for diet options, which focus on the carnivorous nature of dogs and cats, thus, driving the number of products with high and fresh meat claims. Despite the demand for carnivorous diets, veggies are still going mainstream and the producers are innovating their existing products. Free from” for all-the free from trend has been growing, since the past few years and has now hit the mainstream. Pet foods are being formulated with respect to the concerns of humans that include organic and non-GMO ingredients. These ingredients are used in low-carb recipes and have gluten-free claims on new cereal products that increased from one in 15 in 2011 to one in five in 2016. New product launches, with organic or GMO-free ingredients, are witnessing growth in the market. Organic and natural food sales are expected to increase 14.6%, annually, in next two years. For Petco and PetSmart, organic pet foods are bought at a 7.1% and 5.6% rate, respectively, with organic purchases at veterinary clinics at 5.3%. Brands communicate more about the production processes, due to the rising consumer interest in natural plus authenticity and transparency. This is true for the buyers, too, especially, for the ones seeking products in non-traditional formats such as raw, freeze-dried, frozen and baked. Balchem Corp., a global health, and nutrition company, introduced a new line of specialty nutrients and unique processing additives. The Omega Plus range was launched in the South Island in September 2016, after the two years of continuous R&D. In addition, Bob Martin launched Simply+, a range of products marketed as “nutritionally advanced food that provides dogs with all the essentials of a healthy diet”.

CROSS-BORDER ZONE TO HELP MEET BUOYANT DEMAND

The domestic market is growing at an annual rate of above 30% in China and is poised to accelerate at the same rate by 2022, reaching CNY 150 billion and further, making it the third-largest market, worldwide. Moreover, Hangzhou in Zhejiang Province inaugurated the first cross-border pet industry experimental zone in the city’s Jianggan District. The experimental zone will pilot the reforms on the regulation and approval of cross-border imports. It will explore the introduction of national standards in the industry and promote the exportation of domestically made products. Moreover, more than 35 enterprises, including the cross-border e-commerce sites like Tmall, Kaola Beibei, and related logistics & warehousing companies, have been established in the experimental zone. The zone, basically, enables one-stop services and aims to enroll open, transparent, and smart pet food import channels and regulatory policies. Similar efforts are being taken by the countries to focus on the growing pet population and trends. The market players are taking complete advantage of this situation and investing in R&D for innovative product launches.

NOTABLE MARKET DEVELOPMENTS

1. Nestlé Purina launched a new production hall at its facility in Bük, in Hungary’s northwest, making the plant the largest production center in Europe and opened the USD 86 million factories in Brazil. This step is expected to boost the Nestlé Purina for more growth than the domestic market.

2. Carna4: Formulas Inspired by Health Food Trends. This manufacturer takes inspiration from the human health food sector to formulate innovative and whole-food recipes for dogs and cats.

3. PetLife Supersedes Expectations for the Acquisition of Dr. Geoff’s Real Food for Pets. PetLife Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a developer of a new generation of high potency veterinary cancer medications and nutraceuticals for pets, announced that it is acquiring Dr. Geoff’s Real Food for Pets™ and expansion plans for a national rollout.

4. German Company Entering Thailand. Interquell, a German-based dog, and cat food company, entered the Thai industry by forming a joint venture, named Happy Pet (Thailand) Co Ltd, with partner Technic Pet Holding, reported Pets International. Interquell holds 49% of the joint venture. Interquell owns the Happy Dog and Happy Cat premium brands.

TOPICS COVERED IN THE REPORT

How will face-to-face interaction boost the pet food market in Digital Age?

Is low thiamine cat food the cause for Australian cat deaths?

Gluten free foods, GMO foods making their mark in the pet food industry.

Edible insects creeping into pet food popularity.

Humanization and premiumisation on peaks in the pet industry.

Will the US and China continue their dominance in the pet food market? What are the emerging markets?

Will growing market connectivity in Asian countries of Vietnam, Thailand etc. boost the Asia-Pacific pet food market?

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